Throughout my years, I’ve learned the importance of acceptance. Taking everything life throws at me, no matter how unfair – the good, the bad, and the ugly. Acceptance not only allows us to fight through whatever situation we face, but it also allows us to heal after the fact. We don’t waste precious energy mulling over the negatives but redirect our spirit towards achieving a healthy resolution instead.

But while we are in the tough times, how can we best support and nurture our loving selves? How can you find the inner strength to remind yourself that you are strong, you were born fighting, and you can get through anything, when staring in the face of adversity? A great method of boosting positive energy and creating good vibrations is by being your own cheerleader… cheer for yourself, loudly, proudly, and often!

These words of positive encouragement and loving support directed at ourselves are known as positive affirmations, and they can lead to improved mood and self-esteem, a reduction in symptoms of depression and anxiety, and an overall sense of better well-being, helping us feel more in control of your life.

If you’re not sure where to start in the face of adversity, try saying quietly to yourself?

  • “I accept and welcome my thoughts and emotions.”
  • “I believe in my power and strength to overcome this.”
  • “All I can do is my best.”

 

But do positive affirmations really work?

 The answer is a simple ‘Yes’. https://www.healthline.com/health/mental-health/do-affirmations-work

 

Neuroplasticity is the answer!

‘Neuroplasticity’ is a term used to describe our brains’ ability to adapt throughout our lives. Normally, our brain is used to reacting to a stressful setback or frustrating situation one certain way, but we can train our brains to react to them differently.

According to psychologist Marney A. White, sometimes our brains can get a little mixed up on the difference between reality and imagination, which can be surprisingly useful for us. If we regularly repeat to ourselves positive affirmations like those listed above, we can encourage our brains to take these positive affirmations as fact.

Research shows (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4343089/) that people who practiced positive affirmations had more activity in the region of the brain associated with emotional regulation and, most importantly, self-perception. So cheering for yourself will work… and you will eventually believe in yourself!

Studies show that the brain forms new pathways when a task is repeated often, thereby optimizing the performance of the skill.

So, be true to your soul and choose what your soul wants. It wants peace, love, and satisfaction. But you have to put in the work to achieve this. Honestly, sincerely, and responsibly.

Gosia Wojciulewicz

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Research shows (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4343089/) that people who practiced positive affirmations had more activity in the region of the brain associated with emotional regulation and, most importantly, self-perception.

 

Bringing It All Together

When you truly believe you can do something, your actions often follow.

However, positive affirmations may be difficult for some people with low self-esteem, negative self-talk, or body image insecurities. These ideas may stem from other mental health concerns, including depression and anxiety, which should be spoken about with a mental health professional. There’s only so much we can do by ourselves, so it’s crucial to lean on the support of others.

The importance of repetition and consistency.

The reason why diligence, repetition, and consistency are so important in bettering yourself is simple: consistency leads to momentum. The more consistently you practice affirmations, the easier it will be for your brain to accept them as fact. Affirmations practiced repeatedly over a number of days and weeks are remembered better and retained for a longer time.

Studies show that the brain forms new pathways when a task is repeated often, thereby optimizing the performance of the skill.

Eventually, what was once a struggle becomes a habit, and habits are hard to break. That’s why consistency is so important – it is the key to making lasting change.

Words to relieve stress and reduce symptoms of anxiety:

Begin with these easy and gentle words of comfort. Affirmations should not be anxiety-inducing or stressful. You should not promise yourself to reach a goal that is unattainable or unrealistic. It’s vital to stay grounded in realism, so start off small.

  • I’m determined to rise above this.
  • I am in charge of how I feel, and right now I choose peace.
  • Just like before, I’ll survive this situation.
  • There’s no obstacle that I can’t overcome.

 

Words to encourage more optimism:

Optimism has long been touted to positively impact our mental and physical well-being. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2894461/ It’s not often easy to be optimistic, especially for those going through adversity. But again, optimism is something we can train our brains to lean on, and the more often we practice seeing things in a more positive light, the easier it will be for us to continue with it.

 

  • I’m strong. I’m ready for change.
  • Things are easier than they appear.
  • Everything is unfolding as it should.
  • I am planted, rooted, and growing every day.
  • I’m free to focus on the surrounding beauty.

Words of kindness, for believing in your own worth:

Our relationship with ourselves is the only truly life-long relationship we will have. A relationship free from any judgment, resentment, or misunderstanding. Self-love is the most important love of our life. We know it is impossible to pour from an empty cup, so in order to be able to love others, we must first be full of love for ourselves.

  • I am enough. I always have been, I always will be.
  • I deserve to relax. I deserve to be happy.
  • I appreciate who I am.
  • I love me.
  • I can be my own best friend.

Words to lull yourself with before sleep:

We know from research that having a bedtime routine can positively affect sleep. Practising these affirmations by first putting away your smartphone, dimming the lights, and entering a quiet and peaceful state before sleep can help your brain separate the day from the night, clear your mind and body of the day’s stresses, and relax into sleep.

  • My mind and my body are ready to rest. I am in my sanctuary.
  • I am grateful for my body, my body is relaxed. I look forward to tomorrow.
  • I did my best today. Tomorrow is a new opportunity.
  • I deserve love, I deserve peace, I deserve rest.

The best part of trying affirmations and ‘being your own cheerleader’ is that it’s… free! You can start wherever or whenever you want. Why not set aside five or ten minutes at a certain time of day specifically for reciting your mantras. Setting this kind of time-bound, location-bound activity will quickly turn it into a habit.

Cheer for yourself because you are the only compassionate, resilient, and trustworthy source of hope that will show up 100% of the time without fail. Only once your cup is full can you begin to help and heal others.

So, be true to your soul and choose what your soul wants. It wants peace, love, and satisfaction. But you have to put in the work to achieve this. Honestly, sincerely, and responsibly.

Try practising first for just 11 days, then continue to build on your newly acquired, positive and healthy habit.

With love from your other cheerleader!

Gosia